GeekMyTree from Shark Tank

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GeekMyTree is a company that creates animated lights for Christmas trees. These lights are called ‘Animated Glow Balls’, and can be controlled through an app that is available for both IOS and Android devices. You can also use this app to synchronize the lights into numerous music patterns. You can even arrange for the lights to go off and on in sync with your favorite music.

 

The lights are designed for Christmas trees that are around six to eight inches high, and come with strands that can be tied around the trees. In addition, these animated lights are accompanied by a ring that you can fit at the crown of your Christmas tree.

 

Advanced and sophisticated, the lights are designed using premium quality materials, and do not use any cheap hardware, wires, or other subpar components.

 

GeekMyTree was founded by Brad Boyink, who hails from Grand Haven in Michigan. Brad and his coolly-lit house were quite famous around the neighborhood. During 2006, Brad decided to conduct a synchronized light-show at his home, and recorded the entire event.

 

He then posted the video on YouTube, which was met with a surprisingly positive response. Thanks to the video and the response, the light show also became extremely popular and started luring close to 70,000 attendees every year.

 

This then prompted Boyink to convert his innovation into an entrepreneurial venture. He started working on his Christmas lights business, and eventually came up with glow balls.

 

Is GeekMyTree Still An Active Business?

As of 2022, GeekMyTree seems to have gone out of business. The company’ social media channels stopped posting in 2018, and, even though the social media handles and website were updated in 2020, none of the platforms contain a link through which the products can be purchased.

 

It is possible that the business will share a few updates and you can follow its social media profiles if you want to stay abreast of any developments. At the moment, though, there is pin-drop silence.

 

How Did the Shark Tank Pitch Go?

Brad Boyink and GeekMyTree made their Shark Tank appearance in episode 712, which was also labeled the ‘Holiday Special’ episode. Brad was seeking an investment of $225,000, and was willing to offer 25% equity in exchange – an offer that valued the company at $900,000.

 

Alongside the investment, his reason behind coming to Shark Tank was to find a Shark who could help him with distribution and landing his product into larger shops and stores.

 

During his pitch, Brad pointed out that the business’ main objective is to increase the pleasure and thrill associated with Christmas lighting, by integrating tech and animation. He also pointed out that the GeekMyTree lights have been professionally synced, and can be lit according to hundreds of patterns and musical sequences.

 

Kevin’s problem was with the price, as GeekMyTree light sets sell for close to $500. Kevin said that he has seen LED lighting sets being sold for far less, and that people would be unwilling to dish out such a large amount of money on a decoration product.

 

Brad responds by explaining that the high costs are because the products are being produced in very low quantities. According to Brad, increasing the production to 10,000 units can bring the cost down by 20%, while scaling it to 50,000 units can cause a further 30% drop in manufacturing costs.

 

Barbara Corcoran was the first to make her decision; the product and business did not seem appealing to her, primarily because of the high costs. Robert Herjovac also excused himself, stating that he did not feel that people would purchase the product, especially at such a high price. Mark Cuban and Lori Greiner were in agreement with Robert and, they too, decided to bow out.

 

Kevin, despite being unconvinced with the price points, decided to make an offer: $225,000, but in exchange for half the company (50% equity), mainly because he absolutely abhorred having to set up Christmas lights, and Brad’s product had come up with an alternative to this.

 

Brad’s counter-offer was $225,000 for 40%, which was rejected by the Shark, probably due to the high risk involved in the business.

 

Ultimately, Brad accepted Kevin’s initial offer, and decided to give half of his company to Robert in exchange for the investment. According to this deal, the value of Brad’s company was now $450,000.

 

Our Review of GeekMyTree:

Upon trying the GeekMyTree Christmas lights, it is safe to say that they are quite the showstopper, and you really have to see them in person to truly appreciate how good they are.

 

Believe me when we say that you can watch this thing for hours on end without getting tired or bored. The synchronized light-and-music show is also a lot of fun, and the app has quite a healthy collection of Christmas songs and tunes.

 

It is very easy to set up the lights; the entire process should not take you more than five minutes.

 

The speaker, however, has room for improvement. Alternatively, the company could also consider integrating Bluetooth functionality so that the users can connect the lights to a stronger speaker.

 

Pros of GeekMyTree

  • Synchronized lighting and music sequences
  • Easy to set up
  • Excellent customer support

 

Cons of GeekMyTree

  • The sound is not the best
  • No Bluetooth functionality

 

Are There Any Alternatives?

GeekMyTree has two main alternatives or competitors:

  • Novelty Lights, which is a well-established and renowned Christmas lights brand. The company manufactures LED Christmas lights, and sells them at rates that are considerably lower than GeekMyTree.
  • Bulbhead, which is an initiative by Telebrands. Bulbhead sells many different kinds of lights, and calls itself the ‘home of bright ideas’.

 

Our Final Thoughts

GeekMyTree produced innovative, ready-to-plug-in, synchronized Christmas lights, which could be controlled using a smart-phone app. Despite its Shark Tank success, it seems that the company found it hard to survive and, as of 2022, is no longer operational.