Tanoshi Kid Computers from Shark Tank

Tanoshi Kid Computers shark tank
Advertiser Disclosure: Seriosity.com may earn commissions from qualifying purchases.

Navigating parenting in the digital age is challenging. You want to guard your children against inappropriate content but don’t want them to be left behind. Children need technology exposure to develop the skills necessary to succeed in the modern world.

There is no shortage of toddler tablets but is there an affordable solution for low-income families? Also, can you control what your child has access to?

These were the issues Brad Johnson sought to solve by introducing an affordable, child-safe computer. The mission was to equip each child with their own two-in-one laptop/tablet so that no child gets left behind.

He approached the sharks with his co-founder Lisa Love and Director of Fun Greg smith on the twenty-first episode of season eleven. They were seeking five hundred thousand dollars for eight percent equity in their company, Tanoshi, the Japanese word for fun.

The sharks were worried about their profit margins and competition in the child technology space. They received only one offer from Daymond Garfield John for the total amount but in exchange for 20% equity instead of 10%.

Concerned that this would significantly bring down the company’s valuation, Brad asked him to consider 15% instead but was shot down. They ended up taking the deal and have added the Tanoshi Scholar laptop to their inventory.

Our Review of Tanoshi Kid Computers

First things first, we were impressed with the quality of the packaging. We could tell that this wasn’t any toy. The box was on par with those used by top technology companies. The hybrid tablet laptop comes with a start-up guide to help guide parents through setting it up. We appreciated how it was simple to follow, even for parents who aren’t tech-savvy.

Once the Tanoshi connected to our Wi-Fi, it took barely fifteen minutes to download the operating software. The operating software is actually an android 7 operating software. Setting up was a breeze after following the start-up guide. The hybrid laptop comes in pink and blue.

The home screen came with several pre-installed apps for children, including educational games and YouTube. You can download as many apps your child needs for fun or school from the play store with its 32 GB storage. You can also increase the storage with an additional 32GB external micro SD card.

We were a little disheartened that it doesn’t splash and dust resistant like the brand new scholar version. However, given the price, that’s okay. It can handle video conferencing and zoom meetings for online classes. The keyboard is child-sized, but even adults can use it comfortably. Your kids can learn to type without over-stretching their fingers.

Our time playing and learning with the tablet laptop was genuinely fun. It lived up to its namesake. The 10.1″ HD screen is removable so you can use it like a tablet. With other tablets, the connection is flimsy when you buy Bluetooth keypads to use your tablet like a laptop. However, this gets firmly joined to the keyboard with two connector points.

You can genuinely see the thought put into every aspect of this design. It shows that the CEO gained valuable experience as a tech consultant who worked for companies like Apple and Toshiba.

To get all this in under $200 is remarkable. Watching the Shark Tank episode, you can see that they don’t care about their profit margins more than their mission. The new version, the Tanoshi Scholar, is a hundred dollars more expensive with features added from the lessons learned from launching the first one, as seen on Shark Tank.

Pros of Tanoshi Kid Computers

  1. Extremely affordable
  2. Designed specifically for kids with a child-sized keyboard
  3. Equipped with parental controls restricting web access and screen time
  4. Removable screen to use like a tablet or laptop
  5. Pre-installed curated educational apps and games appropriate for children
  6. HD screen with sensitive touch
  7. Full android operating software experience

Cons of Tanoshi Kid Computers

  1. Not waterproof, but the Scholar version is splash and dust proof
  2. Not equipped to handle heavy-graphic video games

Who are Tanoshi Kid Computers For?

Tanoshi kid computers are for children aged four and up. Children in today’s fast-paced, digitally-charged world need access to technology to keep up. During the pandemic, every child needed a device to take their online classes on. However, most tablet and laptop devices are made and marketed to adults. They have unrestricted access to the dangers of the internet.

Handing such a device to your children makes you nervous for their safety. You do not wish them to be exposed to sexually explicit or violent content under your nose. Nor do you want them to be left behind their peers.

Children today are learning how to code earlier than ever. The Tanoshi comes with pre-installed coding games. That means your child can get an early start like their many peers.

If you are a parent concerned for their child’s safety while using technology, then the Tanoshi is perfect for you. You can conveniently manage screen time allowance from your phone through the Google Family Link app.

The Tanoshi is the number one choice for anyone looking for quality along with affordability. Your means should not decide how far you go. Tanoshi wants to provide each child with the opportunity to learn in a fun way, no matter their background.

Are there Any Alternatives?

Most companies make laptops for adults. There aren’t many hybrid laptops built for kids from the ground up. The only one semi-comparable is the Fire HD 10 Kids tablet. This is only a tablet without a keyboard, so it will not help your child learn to type.

Our Final Thoughts

We were pleased with the experience of using the laptop. You can tell it was designed for kids, but it’s definitely not a toy. The improvements made in the second generation were essential. We like that the company takes its mission seriously and hope to see a Tanoshi in every child’s hands.

About The Author